EDITORIAL | Freedom & expression

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This is a time of the year when we are privileged to mark international occasions that underscore the significance of language and expression of ideas toward the preservation of freedom and our rights as member of society.

The International Mother Language Day observance as well as the National Arts Month celebration are events that highlights the importance of birth of our first language and multi-lingualism in the learning process, much more so in the context of a borderless world, where technology is fast changing the landscape for citizens of the world. Complementary to this value is the importance of art as a tool – whether in visual words, songs and other means – to express ideas freely on both matters of aesthetics and citizen empowerment.

These forms of the expression of sentiments unite Filipinos 35 years ago on Feb. 25, through their chants, placards, songs and protest of voices to oust as abusive regime of two decades and liberate the country from a dictatorship that stalled genuine progress and development.

The message of the EDSA People Power Revolution, however, appears to have lost its relevance as indicated by the waning of voices celebrating that momentous event and the seeming reversion to old ways in our daily national life.

The language and expressions against abuses are getting muter and muter.  If these are indications of healing across the land, we do welcome them.  Or is it a manifestation that we easily forget valuable lessons in our natural life as time passes by? National amnesia, as you may agree, is counter-productive.

As we mark the intertwining significance of these February events, we long for voices to continue and for the expressions to further ring in the land to ensure that Filipinos keep the freedom our heroes for centuries and those at EDSA 35 years ago have fought for.

Perhaps on a more positive note, though, we can say that the spirit of the EDSA Revolution is still alive in our sense of unity in the fight against a common enemy, this time the coronavirus disease. – NWI